What I’m reading this summer

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Summer is about catching up. Catching up on your sleep, catching up with distant friends, catching up on your rest and relaxation, and catching up on that list of books you always said you would get round to reading. Didn’t life just get in the way? Here is my list of books I’ll be delving into this summer.

Ted Bundy, Conversations with a Killer by Stephen G. Michaud and Hugh Aynesworth

The first time I watched the Netflix documentary which charted the rise of the most notorious serial killer in history, the man who practically invented the term “serial killer” and who killed innocent women to get a rush, was the first in a long time that I just couldn’t sleep for genuine fear. Yet naturally, I was intrigued, and if you enjoy true crime shows it’s likely you’ll find the book an illuminating exploration into the psychological make-up of a deadly murderer. Written by the two men who interviewed Bundy in prison, I’m sure it will be a compelling, if not disturbing page-turner. 

you’ll find the book an illuminating exploration into the psychological make-up of a deadly murderer

The Unfreedom of the Press by Martin R. Levin

You know it and I know it; politics right now is certainly no barrel of laughs, no matter which side of the Atlantic you’re on. The media seems to be the only people making any sense right now, or so it may seem. Life isn’t as simple as that and Levin’s book, currently a New York Times Bestseller, shows how the American press, rather than critiquing government, always ideologically aligns with mainstream politics. True or not, it sounds like a worthwhile read. 

A reading list doesn’t have to be a sole of Charles Dickens

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Yes, you read that right, I am part of that threatening category of non-conformers; a group of people who never once watched one single episode of the HBO show (and judging by reviews of the last episode, am not hugely remorseful). However, I’m only human, and ‘fomo’ has well and truly kicked in. If you’re anything like me, you’ll want to know what all the fuss is about. If you like epic battles, fantasy allegories for the corrupt nature of politics, and conflicts of familial love and honour, then you might love this book. It’s all about the Iron Throne, apparently.

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur allows us to fall into a poetry of the twenty-first century. She might be the most modern poet ever; with 3.6 million followers on Instagram she is more than any other contemporary figure best suited for the title of ‘celebrity poet’. I delved into The Sun and Her Flowers and finished it within record time. If you like multi-media poetry, you will like Kaur’s work; she champions independence, a reclaiming of self-identity and views of progressiveness with carefully thought-provoking illustrations. I’m looking forward to seeing what her first collection was like, before the more confident self-fashioning and politically-aware nature of her second collection.

Sometimes a book doesn’t have to be a Sunday Times Bestseller to be worth reading

Twilight by Stephanie Meyer (and insert any of your guilty reads here)

Sometimes a book doesn’t have to be a Sunday Times Bestseller to be worth reading. Sometimes we just want a book that reminds us of our Robert Pattinson-loving, ugg-wearing, vampire-crazed teenage selves; that’s where teen fiction comes in. This summer I’m gearing up to re-live and re-read my youth; Twilight, The Vampire Diaries, Harry Potter (anything that reminds me that a reading list doesn’t have to be a sole of Charles Dickens, better yet, that affirms my belief that a reading list is nonsense). You can bet this will be accompanied with popcorn, chocolate-induced tummy aches and staying up past my bedtime.

Image via Pixabay

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