Durham University reveals 25% gender pay gap

By Tania Chakraborti and Cameron McIntosh

Durham University’s gender pay gap is 25.35%, according to a report published today by the University.

The report also finds that the mean gender pay gap for staff bonuses stands at 64.29%.

The figures relate to earnings for the year to April 2017, and include men and women on casual contracts. The gender pay gap represents a total hourly difference of £4.76 in payment between the genders.

“We recognise that the gender pay is a serious issue for Durham University, as it is for society as a whole and the higher education sector in particular”- Vice-Chancellor Stuart Corbridge

The gender pay gap comprises the percentage difference between the average hourly earnings for men and women. Durham’s pay gap is higher than that of the University of Oxford, which came under fire yesterday for its pay gap of 24.5%.

In an email addressed to all students, Durham University Vice Chancellor Stuart Corbridge stated that the report “reflects the fact we have more men than women in higher paid roles”, while affirming that the report does not reflect a discrepancy in hourly earnings for the same job.

The Gender Pay Gap Report revealed that out of staff employed in the Upper Quartile in 2017/18 there were 607 female appointments in contrast to 1,061 male appointments.

Furthermore the report states that the gender pay gap is only higher than 5% in employment grades 2 and 3, which refers to those required to work unsociable hours to maintain 24/7 support in colleges. These positions are disproportionately occupied by male employees. The University stated it was “looking at how to make these roles more attractive to women”.

The Vice-Chancellor addressed the discrepancy in the figures detailed by the report: “I want to emphasise that the gender pay gap is not about equal pay – men and women doing the same job at Durham University are paid the same amount.

“Rather, the gender pay gap is the percentage difference between the average hourly earnings for men and women.”

Professor Corbridge went on to assure students of the University’s commitment to addressing the gap through action approved by the University Executive Committee and University Council. This includes a review of recruitment practices for all staff, pay review policies and a review by professional support staff in areas where there is a gender pay gap.

The Vice-Chancellor stated in summary that: “We recognise that the gender pay is a serious issue for Durham University, as it is for society as a whole and the higher education sector in particular.

“We are committed to openness and transparency in sharing our position with you and updating you on the progress of our action plan.”

Photograph: Rachael Mundy via Flickr

 

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