The fountain of youth

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Anti-ageing skincare advice was traditionally cordoned off  for those in their 30s and beyond, but new trends are seeing people in their teenage years reaching for methods to prevent their skin becoming wrinkled.

Wearing SPF every day and avoiding smoking are the easiest ways to retain a smooth complexion, and, if you’re in the market for skincare tips: this is the way to go if you’re in your early twenties.

However, it seems due to the pressure to look smoother, younger and more polished has led to an interest in preventing wrinkles, particularly on the face, altogether. The guaranteed way to banish wrinkles with instant gratification: Botox. Botox injections contain a toxin called onobotulinumtoxin A, that temporarily prevent muscles from moving, preventing and reducing wrinkles on the skin. The toxin is produced by the microbe that causes botulism, a type of food poisoning.

Despite a rise in more age-inclusive practices such as advertising, the face that never ages, especially a woman’s face, is a powerful one

Indeed, since Botox treatments first became available, they have faithfully been aimed at those aged 50 and beyond. But now, thanks to advances in medical technology, the rise of ‘baby Botox’ is turning the heads of skincare junkies. Some aestheticians, in a movement which had been propelled by social media sites such as TikTok, recommend starting to get ‘baby Botox’ from the age of 25. The idea is to prevent, not eradicate, wrinkles already created by a life of tears, laughter and sun. 

With this rise in popularity across age groups comes a rise in people offering the treatment, and as it’s such an unregulated industry there are salons in which people wield this potentially scarring poison, reading for injection after just a few days training. Those who are injecting Botox should be a medical practitioner and on a register to prove they currently meet set standards in training, skill and insurance. 

It’s such an unregulated industry; there are salons in which people wield this potentially scarring poison, ready for injection after just a few days training

Are there other reasons to be scared? Absolutely. The fear of ageing is almost a human universal, and science has now given us the tools to achieve an extended youth, past its usual expiration date. Despite a rise in more age-inclusive practices such as advertising, the face that never ages, especially a woman’s face, is a powerful one. If she retains her youth, and in turn her beauty, she retains a currency that has been statistically proven to improve her chances of winning others’ approval, making her more successful in her career, her social life and beyond.

And so, despite the ominous undertones of the 25-year-old woman who injects poison into her skin to remain pretty, if it actively helps her in the society she didn’t create, who are we to hold this against her?

Image credit: Mike Baumeister via Unsplash

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