Creativity in Lockdown – an aspirational destination?

By

The first lockdown was a phenomenon; the whole world slowed down, and people finally had a chance to read books, watch films, relax, and exercise. The second lockdown showed the ‘keep calm and carry on’ spirit of the British public, and life felt relatively normal even though the word ‘lockdown’ was heard often. However, this third lockdown is a completely different ballgame…

Even though we are nearly halfway through, this lockdown feels never-ending. It seems as though you wake up, do nothing all day and then end up back in bed. It is no surprise, therefore, that sleep patterns have disappeared, and every small action feels like a massive effort.

I simply want to cocoon until Boris sets us free.

It feels as though I have been watching TV and films, reading books and making banana bread since March. If you’ve been doing the same thing for nearly a year, there is no doubt that you’re bored – particularly when you were anticipating being back at university for the second term.

While the first lockdown managed to foster my desire to be creative, the third lockdown has certainly hindered it. I have the same amount of free time in this lockdown as the first, but instead of wanting to fill my time, I simply want to cocoon until Boris sets us free.

Disappointed by my sluggish behaviour, I set out to rectify it. Bored of reading and looking at a screen all day, I decided to give podcasts a go. To kill two birds in one stone, I decided to go for a walk while listening.

Put simply, listening to podcasts has completely changed my mindset; I feel inspired to write, create, put myself out there, and try something new. After trying a few different ones, I found interviews where various people talk about their journey to success and the various bumps along the way were the most inspiring. These were some of my favourites that I would recommend if anyone is feeling their less-creative selves:

How to Fail with Elizabeth Day

Elizabeth Day brings in the broadest range of interviewees. She makes them so comfortable that they share their failures with her. Not only is this idea innovative, but the podcast encourages mistakes and bumps in the road – a phenomenon rarely seen in the media.

David Tennant Does A Podcast With…

Where most interviewers meet interviewees for the first time, David Tennant takes a different approach. He interviews famous friends and colleagues and injects elements of his own life in the conversation. While he sometimes seems to enjoy talking about himself a bit too much, the comparison between elements of his life and the interviewees’ provides an interesting conversation and often inspires.

Grounded with Louis Theroux

Louis Theroux is an icon. His podcast is fascinating – he gets stars to open up about unheard elements of their personal lives and feel at ease. The stars also seem to be fans of his, meaning that we get to hear a bit about his life as well as theirs.

Desert Island Discs

There are thousands of these to listen to from so many different backgrounds. Must admit that Kirsty Young is a better host than Lauren Laverne, so scroll further down and find some of these archived ones.

These podcasts are available on Spotify and Apple Podcasts. If you’re feeling less creative, they certainly inspiring and encourage creativity. These podcasts reminded me that every person’s journey in life is different and that you make your own luck. There is no set method for success and doing your best at the moment is undoubtedly enough.

If this lockdown isn’t going to foster creativity, force creativity on yourself. A change of mindset is necessary; turn off the depressing news, spend some time outside and off the screen, and let your mind stir. Create, create, create…

Illustrations by

https://www.dunelm.org.uk/donations/palatinate

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.