Review: You Dunnit!

By Tansy Adam

At the Mark Hillery Arts Centre last night audiences were shushed by writers and who came onto the stage to tell us what to expect, which off the bat gave the show an immersive, interactive feel. The story was dynamic and fast-moving. A particular highlight was the characters’ frequent references to the shows ‘kind sponsor’. The beauty of Stanton and Lycett’s writing is that the show would differ from night to night depending on the audiences response. The show follows two detectives played by, and who are attempting to investigate a murder however, I do not want to give too much away as I feel part of the excitement of the show is trying to work out exactly what is going on.

The beauty of Stanton and Lycett’s writing is that the show would differ from night to night depending on the audiences response

The physical comedy of the actors was outstanding- a particular highlight being an improvised ice skating routine performed by which took him off the stage. The use of multi-rolling also added to the tumultuous nature of the show. All actors’ performances were strong with each cast member bringing something different in each of their characters, whether that be a new voice or physicality. This really made each individual scene enjoyable to watch. Vellucci’s ‘De’ was a personal highlight. With impeccable comic timing, jokes are delivered with ease.

All actor’s performances were strong with each cast member bringing something different in each of their characters, whether that be a new voice or physicality

Standout performers of the night were the team of Henchmen made up of and Jack Simmonds. Rossiter’s French Art Teacher was the strongest and most hilarious moment of the show, having me and my fellow audience members belly laughing throughout the scene. Simmonds ‘Henchmen number 1’ was also especially funny. The show’s tech was also commendable with the lighting switching between the stage and the audience with ease. With this said at times the tumultuous nature of the show resulted in genuine confusion which left audience members puzzled as to how to react and respond. There were also a few issues with clarity of delivery with many of the lines, meaning audiences had to try and work out what the characters’ line were based on the context of the scene. All in all, Stanton and Lycett’s You Dunnit is a dynamic piece of student writing that leaves you in stitches.

Image credit: Blizzard Theatre Company

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