Britain’s Brexit debilitations

By Matthew Spivey

Brexit’s sequential talks have been coined as ‘basically illegal’ by Richard Tice, co-founder of the organisation, Leave Means Leave. Mr Tice made the comment in a scathing interview he gave to Sky News condemning Theresa May for ‘negotiating against herself’, before prescribing Phillip Hammond to ‘take a happy pill’ if negotiations are to provide a more positive outcome.

As UK businesses have begun to doubt whether the EU trade deals will be successful, the World Trade Organisation (WTO) has been considered as a viable alternative, a notion backed by large business owners, such as Wetherspoons founder Tim Martin. The WTO is an organisation already used by Australia and the USA, but in order to become an active member Britain must first autonomise itself from the EU.

Meanwhile, Chancellor Phillip Hammond has faced a back-lash after proposing ‘modest negotiations’, though he claims the comment has been taken out of context. With no sign of resolution until 2019, the ‘modest’ approach that Mr Hammond has – rightly or wrongly – put forward has not been received well by key figures in the worlds of politics or business.

Tensions have also been rising between the Chancellor and  Brexit negotiator David Davis; though Mr Davis has attempted to assure us that the pair have ‘no difference’ on the terms of the Brexit outcomes, only the strategy by which to achieve them.

Though Theresa May’s Brexit team have been clear to assert that they are determined to achieve a negotiation ‘that serves the British economy and that serves the British people’ alike, Mr Hammond was accused by Mr Tice of ‘trying to trap us into some sort of Brexit membership into the European Union’. Unless the PM’s team can secure a deal by early 2019, it certainly will begin to feel that way.

Photograph: Derek Bennett via Flickr

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