Q&A: meet the people behind Palatinate

First up, meet Palatinate (Pal) Editor-in-Chief, Max Kendix. He’s a third-year Castle student studying PPE.

Q. How and when did you get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. I picked up my first print edition in freshers’ week, but had a pretty bumpy sign-up journey…First, I turned up to the welcome drinks at the Library Bar on the wrong day and accidentally walked into the Anime Society social. Then I applied for a few positions and didn’t get an interview, and just before lockdown struck, I became Profile Editor. From that I moved to News, then Deputy, now Editor. It’s been fantastic.

Q. What is your favourite thing that you’ve written about?

A. When we first launched the Satire section, I had a lot of fun writing the first few articles. Second to that is maybe being able to include “crocodile porn” in a headline about a disrupted JCR meeting. Durham’s a funny place.

Q. Why should freshers get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. It’s so much fun. I’m biased but it’s the best thing you can do at Durham. It brilliantly combines finding friends in a group, learning new skills, expressing yourself, the ability to launch a career in journalism, and entertaining or informing thousands of students. Join in, you’ll love it.

The other Editor-in-Chief is Toby Donegan-Cross. He’s a fourth-year history student in St. Aidan’s who has just returned from a year abroad in France.

Q. How and when did you get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. Through a bizarre twist of fate, I was appointed Investigationstions Editor at the beginning of my second year. I was completely out of my depth and had no experience to speak of, but was lucky to have editors managing me who were immensely patient. I was soon being interviewed for a role in News by the then Editor, Tom and virtually bit his hand off when he offered me the position.

Q. What is your favourite thing that you’ve written about?

A. Some students and staff put a huge three metre (!) golden penis statue up in Castle great hall. Naturally, it caused heat and vicious debate about artistic standards with a lengthy conflict in Castle MCR. We had terrific fun thinking of headline, landing on “Golden cock-up at Castle College”. Levity goes a long way in a
news section.

Q. What is Palatinate/Indigo’s biggest myth?

A. Less a myth and more a peeve, and that is that the paper is called ‘the Palatinate’. ‘Palatinate’ (no ‘the’) is the name.

I’m biased but it’s the best thing you can do at Durham; you’ll love it.

is one of the two Indigo Editors. She studies Geography (BSc) and is also a third-year Castle student.

Q. How and when did you get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. My first involvement with the paper was during the freshers social just after Christmas in my first year. I’d seen the event advertised on Facebook and while I was initially reluctant to go, everyone there was so welcoming and I got to speak to several members of the editorial board. After that, I started contributing articles to various sections and then applied for an editorial position a couple of months later. Aside from writing for the paper, I had no journalistic experience at all – just enthusiasm and a willingness to learn on the job.

Q. What is your favourite thing that you’ve written about?

A. Last summer I wrote a rather niche piece about the lack of conventional punctuation incommercially popular contemporary novels such as those by Sally Rooney and Bernardine Evaristo. That’s what is so great about Palatinate: any current student can write and read about a huge variety of interesting topics.

Q. What is Palatinate/Indigo’s biggest myth?

A. That we require prior experience to get involved. Lots of people think that Palatinate is some mysterious organisation run by a small selection of students who
all already know each other. Not true! It is so easy to get involved with the paper – no journalistic experience is necessary and all the first-round applications are
completely anonymised.

is the other half of the Indigo Editor duo. She is a Liberal Arts student at St. Marys.

Q. How and when did you get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. I first wrote an article in Term one for Stage but used the third lockdown in Term two to write approximately twenty articles for a wide range of sections. This intense writing spree then led me to apply to be Deputy Comment Editor, my first editorial position in Palatinate.

Q. What is your favourite section of Palatinate/Indigo?

A. I think that Creative Writing is a really strong section. Their constant encouragement of contributors, introducing ideas such as a Whatsapp group when
contributors experience writer’s block!

Q. What is Palatinate/Indigo’s biggest myth?

A. That it’s difficult to get involved. It is as easy as joining some contributor groups and offering to write articles that they suggest, or emailing a section with one of
your ideas for an article.

Q. Why should freshers get involved with Palatinate/Indigo?

A. Writing for Palatinate is one of the best ways to get journalistic experience during your time at Durham, and to get feedback on your writing from the editors
in order to improve. Getting involved as an editor teaches you how to deal with people and issues as they arise, and also brings you further into a brilliant
and accepting community.

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